st patrick’s day non alcoholic drink ideas

st patrick’s day non alcoholic drink ideas Today, St. Patrick’s Day has become an international celebration. Beginning in 1995, the Irish government made March 17 a national holiday in an effort to boost tourism. Today, approximately 1 million people attend the St. Patrick’s Day parade in Dublin.

st patrick’s day non alcoholic drink ideas

st patrick's day non alcoholic drink ideas
st patrick’s day non alcoholic drink ideas
st patrick's day non alcoholic drink ideas
st patrick’s day non alcoholic drink ideas
st patrick's day non alcoholic drink ideas
st patrick’s day non alcoholic drink ideas
st patrick's day non alcoholic drink ideas
st patrick’s day non alcoholic drink ideas
st patrick's day non alcoholic drink ideas
st patrick’s day non alcoholic drink ideas

For those that are planning to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day on March 17 or the weekend before, below are 25 quotes, blessings and traditional sayings to spread the luck of the Irish.

Sayings:

There are only two kinds of people in the world, The Irish and those who wish they were.

In Heaven there is no beer that’s why we drink it here!

May you live as long as you want and never want as long as you live.

“St. Patrick — one of the few saints whose feast day presents the opportunity to get determinedly whacked and make a fool of oneself all under the guise of acting Irish.” — Charles M. Madigan

May the luck of the Irish be with you!

You’ve got to do your own growing, no matter how tall your father was.

In the early 1800s, the impoverished and rapidly growing rural population of Ireland had become almost totally dependent on one crop. Only the potato could produce enough food to sustain families farming the tiny plots of land the Irish peasants had been forced onto by British landlords.

The lowly potato was an agricultural marvel, but staking the lives of an entire population on it was enormously risky.

Sporadic potato crop failures had plagued Ireland in the 1700s and early 1800s. And in the mid-1840s a blight caused by a fungus struck potato plants across all of Ireland.

The failure of essentially the entire potato crop for several years led to unprecedented disaster. And Ireland and America would be changed forever.