st patrick’s day cartoon pictures

st patrick’s day cartoon pictures Cheeks crimson, hair like silk to touch, Indeed, indeed, I shall not die, Please God, not I, for any such! The golden locks, the forehead thin, The quiet mien, the gracious ease, The rounded heel, the languid tone, Fools alone find death from these.

st patrick’s day cartoon pictures

st patrick's day cartoon pictures
st patrick’s day cartoon pictures
st patrick's day cartoon pictures
st patrick’s day cartoon pictures
st patrick's day cartoon pictures
st patrick’s day cartoon pictures
st patrick's day cartoon pictures
st patrick’s day cartoon pictures
st patrick's day cartoon pictures
st patrick’s day cartoon pictures

Thy sharp with, thy perfect calm,

Thy thin palm like foam of the sea;

Thy white neck, thy blue eye,

I shall not die for thee.

Woman, graceful as the swan,

A wise man did rear me, too,

Little palm, white neck, bright eye

I shall not die for you.

I’m not so sure you could describe this as an Irish love poem. It really just deals with the age old frustrations but great nonetheless and I just love O’ Connor’s translation

I fasted three canonical hours

To try and come round the heavenly powers;

I washed my shift where the stream was deep

To hear a lover’s voice in sleep;

Often I swept the woodstack bare,

Burned bits of my frock, my nails, my hair,

Up the chimney stuck the flail,

Slept with a spade without avail;

Hid my wool in a limekiln late

And my distaff behind the churchyard gate;

I had flax on the road to halt coach or carriage

And haycocks stuffed with heads of cabbage,

And night and day on the proper occasions

Invoked Old Nick and all his legions,

But ‘twas no good and I’m brokenhearted,

For here I’m back at the place I started;

And this is the cause of all my tears.

I am fast in the rope of the rushing years,

With age and need in lessening span,

And death beyond, and no hope of a man.

Dónal Óg

8th Century poem

Translated by Lady Gregory (1855-1932)

It is late last night the dog was speaking of you;

the snipe was speaking of you in her deep marsh.

It is you are the lonely bird through the woods;

and that you may be without a mate until you find me.

You promised me, and you said a lie to me,

that you would be before me where the sheep are flocked;

I gave a whistle and three hundred cries to you,

and I found nothing there but a bleating lamb.

You promised me a thing that was hard for you,

a ship of gold under a silver mast;

twelve towns with a market in all of them,

and a fine white court by the side of the sea.

You promised me a thing that is not possible,

that you would give me gloves of the skin of a fish;

that you would give me shoes of the skin of a bird;

and a suit of the dearest silk in Ireland.

When I go by myself to the Well of Loneliness,

I sit down and I go through my trouble;

when I see the world and do not see my boy,

he that has an amber shade in his hair.

It was on that Sunday I gave my love to you;

the Sunday that is last before Easter Sunday

and myself on my knees reading the Passion;

and my two eyes giving love to you for ever.

My mother has said to me not to be talking with you today,

or tomorrow, or on the Sunday;

it was a bad time she took for telling me that;

it was shutting the door after the house was robbed.

My heart is as black as the blackness of the sloe,

or as the black coal that is on the smith’s forge;

or as the sole of a shoe left in white halls;

it was you put that darkness over my life.

You have taken the east from me, you have taken the west from me;

you have taken what is before me and what is behind me;