Tere Bin Laden Dead Or Alive movie update

Tere Bin Laden Dead Or Alive movie update It has been six long years since Tere Bin Laden mopped up a neat pile from the box office. There’s more packed into the script this time around, and a little more energy and pace. But the problem of repetition persists. Six years back, It’s Osama time again, folks the film was called, simply, ‘Tere Bin Laden’. Now it’s got a tagline attached: ‘Dead Or Alive’, so our Bin Laden lookalike Pradhuman aka Paddy Singh is made to work doubly hard, because he is of great use in either state, depending upon whether you are the first Black President of the Yewnited States looking to be re-elected, or a bearded terrorist keen to show the world that his beloved leader is still around. Like the 2010 sleeper hit, the follow-up is the handiwork of writer-director Abhishek Sharma.

Tere Bin Laden Dead Or Alive movie update

Tere Bin Laden Dead Or Alive movie update
Tere Bin Laden Dead Or Alive movie update

So one expected it to possess some of the spark that had helped Tere Bin Laden punch well above its weight. As it transpires, most of the punches that Tere Bin Laden: Dead or Alive throws are woefully feeble. The film takes ages to spring to life. When it does begin to show some signs of vitality, it flails about aimlessly. In the dying minutes of the first half, Tere Bin Laden Dead or Alive raises a few laughs as a series of mistaken identities sparks some serious manic mayhem. But post-interval, the film, despite many explosions and gunfights, goes completely comatose again never to sufficiently revive itself. One of the characters describes it best. This Hollywood-Bollywood mashup is a bit like having chicken burger with dal makhni, he says.

Tere Bin Laden Dead Or Alive movie update
Tere Bin Laden Dead Or Alive movie update

Many familiar faces show up: apart from Pradhuman Singh, who still looks amazingly like the world’s most dreaded terrorist dead-or-alive, there is the smiley Zafar in a walk-on-part as a Bolly star, Garg in a ditsier short-dress avatar, Rahul Singh as a mimicry artist, and Mishra, this time as a gun-toting arms dealer. The new ‘uns include Manish Paul, the second gen ‘halwai’ who runs away from the prospect of making ‘jalebis’ for the rest of his life. Tere Bin Laden: Dead or Alive, is seldom on the right side of that line. For want of the inspired writing that launched the franchise, it rests mostly on deadwood ideas that are as insubstantial as they are prone to rapid disintegration. This movie is best avoided unless a bunch of characters running around in circles is one’s idea of entertainment.